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Social Sciences career opportunities for each academic program 

 1. DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES & HUMANITIES

 BA International Relations and Diplomacy.

IR is highly interdisciplinary; hence students gain a range of skills such as;

  • Foreign and domestic policy
  • Diplomacy – diplomatic law, practice and etiquette
  • Critical analytical and communication skills – to engage in political discourse, research and problem solving
  • Negotiation skills
  • International security
  • Diplomacy
  • International law
  • Geopolitics and grand strategy
  • International politics
  • International political history
  • International political economy
  • Democracy and governance

With the above skills, IR practitioners can apply themselves in multiple areas such as;

  • Government agencies that deal with international relations, diplomacy and policy
  • Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Embassies
  • Immigration
  • Policy analyst/officer
  • Intelligence
  • Civil society e.g. NGOs
  • Humanitarian organizations
  • International Organizations e.g. United Nations, African Union, East African Community
  • County Government
  • Strategic communication and public relations
  • Consultancies
  • Educational institutions
  • Think tanks
  1. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

 

All counselling psychology programmes (DCP, BCP, PGDCP, MCP, PhD)

  1. Health institutions (mental health clinics, psychiatric hospitals, hospital, hospices, etc)
  2. Universities (as counsellors)
  3. Drugs rehabilitation centre
  4. Religious institutions (churches, mosques, etc)
  5. NGOs
  6. Teaching
  7. Research
  8. Probation services
  9. Child protection services
  10. Gender issues
  11. Prison services
  12. Schools

 

 

  1. DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

 

  1. BARCHELORS IN DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

Have you got a passion for addressing the major issues and challenges facing today’s global community? The BA Development Studies programme draws upon the significant expertise of our academic staff. This exciting programme examines key topics in international development while analysing the roles and impact of a wide variety of regional and international actors. Additionally, it enables you to develop a specialist niche for yourself if you combine it with any other subject.

This degree is aimed at understanding the issues of poverty, inequality, injustices and changing societies. Students acquire knowledge as well as practical and academic skills with regard to the attempts to address these challenges by means of development projects, programmes and policies. This involves the management and evaluation of interventions as well as the contexts that are relevant. Development Studies is presented as multi-disciplinary and holistic. As one of the few undergraduate programmes in Development Studies in the country, this qualification is a strong basis for a career in the field of development or further study in Development Studies.

Potential Industries

  • Business Development
  • Community Centres
  • Disaster Management & Relief
  • Economic Development
  • Education
  • Government  
  • Human Rights
  • Immigration
  • International Business
  • International Development
  • International Literacy Organizations
  • International relief
  • Non-profits & NGO's
  • Policy Activist
  • Post-Secondary
  • Program Evaluation
  • Public Health
  • Public Policy
  • Research and Development
  • Tourism
  • Urban and Regional Planning

Sample Job Titles

Please note some of these positions may require further training, certification or education. Check out the occupational profiles to review the full details for the occupations that interest you

    • Business or Government Consultant
    • Community Development Worker
    • Development Officer
    • Diplomat
    • Economic Development Advisor/Officer
    • Economic Policy Analyst
    • Ecotourism Guide/Agent
    • Foreign Service Officer
    • Fundraiser
    • Government Relations Advisor
    • Immigration Officer
    • Intelligence Officer
    • International Aid Worker
    • International Communications Expert
    • International Policy Analyst
    • International Youth Worker
    • Market Researcher
    • Peace/Human Rights Activist
    • Policy/Political Risk Analyst
    • Program Analyst
    • Project Coordinator
    • Research Assistant/Researcher
    • Teacher/Professor
    • Volunteer Co-ordinator/Recruiter

ii). BACHELORS IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Study in Community Development equips and empower groups of people by providing them with the requisite skills to eff­ect change in their own communities. Community developers must be knowledgeable in both how to work with individuals and how to aff­ect communities' positions within the context of larger social institutions

Its key purpose is to build communities based on justice, equality and mutual respect. Community development involves changing the relationships between ordinary people and people in positions of power, so that everyone can take part in the issues that affect their lives.

Typical employers

  • Community development projects
  • Local urban and rural development groups
  • Organisations concerned with particular groups (women, Travellers, new communities) or issues (unemployment, migrant rights, drugs, poverty).
  • Business Development
  • Community Centres
  • Disaster Management & Relief
  • Economic Development
  • Education
  • Government  
  • Human Rights
  • Immigration
  • International Business
  • International Development
  • International Literacy Organizations
  • International relief
  • Non-profits & NGO's
  • Policy Activist
  • Post-Secondary
  • Program Evaluation
  • Public Health
  • Public Policy
  • Research and Development
  • Tourism
  • Urban and Regional Planning

Community work approaches are increasingly used in related areas (local economic development, health promotion, participatory arts) and positions of leadership and management are increasingly open to graduates with relevant experience.

Sample Job Titles

Please note some of these positions may require further training, certification or education. Check out the occupational profiles to review the full details for the occupations that interest you

    • Business or Government Consultant
    • Community Development Worker
    • Development Officer
    • Diplomat
    • Economic Development Advisor/Officer
    • Economic Policy Analyst
    • Ecotourism Guide/Agent
    • Foreign Service Officer
    • Fundraiser
    • Government Relations Advisor
    • Immigration Officer
    • Intelligence Officer
    • International Aid Worker
    • International Communications Expert
    • International Policy Analyst
    • International Youth Worker
    • Market Researcher
    • Peace/Human Rights Activist
    • Policy/Political Risk Analyst
    • Program Analyst
    • Project Coordinator
    • Research Assistant/Researcher
    • Teacher/Professor
    • Volunteer Co-ordinator/Recruiter

iii). BACHELORS IN SOCIAL WORK AND ADMINISTRATION

It is important to distinguish between social workers and social work administrators. Social workers provide direct help to families, individuals, workers, students, the homeless and more. Administrators, on the other hand, oversee some aspect of an organization, such as governmental bodies or non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

While the roles do share some commonalities, like the main focus of helping people find services or housing, an administrator’s role is at the macro level. They oversee the workers at that organization, help track case files, ensure proper documentation of various cases, and make decisions that affect individual employees or the organization as a whole.

In order to become an effective social work administrator, you will need a deep knowledge of the social policies and ethics requirements in your field, as well as human behavior and psychology. You will also need a clear vision for the future, so you can help direct the path of your organization.

Social Work Administrator Career Opportunities

Social work administrators work in a huge variety of fields. These span agencies at home and abroad, as well as every state in America and its protectorates. They may work in people- or program-oriented roles, helping to Specific names or titles of roles may vary with the organization for which they work, but in general they may perform duties such as:

  • Work as school counselors or therapists to help students, teachers and administrators through difficult situations
  • Manage the cases of social workers for child or domestic welfare
  • Work to help agencies on aging better serve their elderly populations
  • Prepare reports, white papers and recommendations to superiors or regulatory bodies
  • Work with probation departments to assess readiness of people to reenter society
  • Provide support to hospitals or home health organizations

In order to fulfill these duties, you need a need a deep understanding of how to serve people, their behaviors and motivations, and the challenges of disadvantaged populations. You will also need a thorough ability to handle tasks associated with business, such as the aforementioned budgeting and financial reporting.

Moreover, you will need to be a good communicator. Much of social work administration requires speaking with your subordinates and superiors, as well as talking with governmental, non-governmental or state authorities to advocate on behalf of clients. Sometimes, you may be called upon to step in on difficult cases and speak to the individuals, families or organizations involved.

Where They Work

Most social workers work in an office setting, though many spend a large portion of their time visiting clients in their homes, schools, and in the community. Social workers most often work in the following settings:

    • Hospitals, medical clinics
    • Community mental health agencies and substance misuse clinics
    • Governments including child welfare agencies and departments of health and human services
    • Schools and other youth-serving organizations
    • Defense forces/ military
    • Correctional facilities
    • Private practices
    • Employee assistance programs
    • Probation departments
    • Public welfare agencies
    • Social service agencies
    • School personnel departments

iv). BACHELORS IN SOCIOLOGY

 

Sociology is a social science concerned with the study of society and human behaviour and relationships. It uses empirical investigation and critical analysis to understand social order and problems and changes within society, organisations and networks. 

The subject matter is diverse and can cover anything from race, social class, crime and law, poverty, education and more theoretical wider issues such as the impact of radical change to whole societies.

Social Work Career Information

Social work is about helping people improve their lives through therapy, government assistance and social policy. Social workers help individuals, families and communities by assisting them in addressing a multitude of issues, including substance abuse, spousal or child abuse, unemployment, inadequate housing, life-threatening diseases, disabilities and mental illness. Social workers are also involved in public policy, social work advocacy and social work research. Specifically sociologists can work as:

 

·         Guidance Counselor

Guidance counselors use knowledge of the sociology of learning to help students navigate the academic world. They also communicate with families to devise strategies to support student achievement. Guidance counselors use interview and counseling techniques to help students make academic and career choices.

Guidance counselors use problem-solving skills to mediate conflicts and resolve social problems within schools. They facilitate group sessions and instruct students about social issues like bullying, substance abuse, and safe sex.

·         Human Resources (HR) Representative HR representatives need to be effective and show finesse in their interactions with a broad range of individuals and groups. They must be able to analyze work roles and assess the suitability of candidates for jobs. Interviewing skills learned by sociology majors are essential for such evaluation. HR staff members use problem-solving skills to mediate conflicts and resolve personnel issues. HR representatives use analytical and decision-making skills to evaluate alternative structures for employee benefits.

·         Management Consultant Management consultants analyze business issues, research possible remedies or enhancements, and present solutions to clients. New college graduates often start out in positions like research analyst, research assistant, or junior consultant, where they support the work of more senior staff. Sociology majors develop the qualitative and quantitative research skills to understand a business problem. Their problem-solving skills help them to generate viable solutions to these issues. Writing and public speaking skills are also critical when constructing reports and presenting analyses and solutions to clients.

·         Market Research Analyst Market research analysts test products and services and evaluate the effectiveness of marketing campaigns. They utilize social science research techniques, including interviews, surveys, and focus groups, to gather data. Market researchers employ statistical methods mastered by sociology majors to analyze data. Market researchers often track preferences for specific consumer groups. The sociologist’s knowledge of gender, youth, aging, race, ethnicity, and social class helps to inform these assessments.

·         Media Planner Media planners assess the advertising needs of clients and design a media plan to enhance sales to various groups. Like sociology majors, they must be able to interpret research and analyze the preferences of their target population. Media planners are aided by sociological knowledge as they study the characteristics of various groups in order to select the best possible media to advertise their product.

·         Policy Analyst Policy analysts research issues that affect the public. They recommend legislation to address those problems. Knowledge of sociology helps analysts to assess the impact of legislation on social problems and various populations. Sociology majors have the foundation to analyze issues like welfare, poverty, substance abuse, job training, education, healthcare, and gay marriage. Policy analysts - like sociology majors - rely on strong writing skills to represent the findings of their research and convince legislators and the public of the viability of their recommendations.

·         Public Relations (PR) Specialist PR specialists need to be the ultimate communicators. As such, they must have the sociology major's ability to understand an audience and its attitudes, needs, and preferences. Writing skills are critical for crafting high-impact press releases. Public relations staff must have the interpersonal skills to talk to the media and convince them to cover stories about their client or organization. They need to convey ideas clearly to staff and clients and engender support and consent for their ideas.

·         Social Worker Social workers apply the knowledge of social dynamics and social institutions learned as a sociology major to assess client issues and help to resolve problems. They make referrals to appropriate community agencies to leverage resources on behalf of individuals and families. Active listening and verbal communication skills are essential to assessing problems and advising clients about ways to improve their lives.

·         Survey Researcher/Pollster Survey researchers and pollsters measure attitudes and opinions in areas familiar to the sociology major, like social and political issues, health, culture, and consumer products. They carefully compose survey questions to elicit clear answers. Survey researchers use the data collection and statistical analysis techniques that sociology majors learn. They write and present reports to share their findings with clients. Survey researchers use knowledge of groups and sub-cultures as they assess the opinions of targeted demographics. They must be curious about a social phenomenon in order to conduct background research about survey topics.

·         Social work Sociology majors are usually people who are dedicated to helping others and making the world a better place, so they will often turn to social work as a means of making that happen. And since they have a solid understanding of the complex issues affecting the people they work with, sociology majors can be especially effective in this type of role.

·         Politics Because they desire change, many sociology majors also work in politics, either trying to enact change as policymakers or working behind the scenes to get politicians elected or to promote causes and bring them to the attention of influential figures.

·         Activism After seeing the big problems society is dealing with, many sociology majors turn to activism as a way of effecting change on a large scale. Activism comes in many forms, including working for a nonprofit that specializes in promoting a particular cause or becoming an advocate.

·         Journalism Sociology can also be a great foundation for a journalism career. By doing field work and analyzing data, you’ll learn how to find subjects, approach them and get the information you want. Additionally, sociology gives you exposure to a variety of societal problems and this can help you figure out your journalistic focus. For instance, if you’ve taken lots of criminal justice courses in college, writing for the crime beat is an easy transition.

·         Academia Many sociology majors go on to become experts in a particular group or type of behavior. For instance, a professor could focus on social movements and how they have and haven’t changed over time. Another professor could study something as specific as rap music over the course of the 1990s and what that means for society today.

·         Law On many occasions, incensed by the huge societal problems at hand, sociology majors will turn to the legal profession as a way of making an impact. While some choose to go to law school to become lawyers, others decide to become paralegals, probation officers or investigators. All of these positions are a critical part of the criminal justice system and a natural fit for those who are passionate about social issues.

·         Education Sociology majors also go into education in the hopes of making a difference in the lives of both young people and adults. While secondary and postsecondary education (high school and college) are the most popular teaching areas, sociology majors can be found in teaching positions across all grade levels. In many cases, young graduates may turn to teaching nonprofits to become certified educators.

POSSIBLE EMPLOYERS

BUSINESS

  • public relations
  • marketing and sales
  • consumer research
  • human resources (personnel management)
  • insurance
  • real estate
  • training
  • entrepreneurship
  • media

COMMUNITY SERVICE

  • non-profit agencies
  • urban planning
  • childcare
  • community development
  • environmental groups
  • advocacy

FAMILY SERVICE

  • family planning
  • substance abuse education
  • rehabilitation counseling
  • hospital admissions
  • insurance providers

HIGHER EDUCATION

  • admissions
  • advising
  • alumni relations
  • development
  • administrative support

LAW

  • law enforcement
  • investigations
  • probation and parole administration
  • criminal justice
  • judicial affairs
  • attorney
  • paralegal

PUBLISHING

  • professional writing
  • research
  • editing
  • journalism

SOCIAL SERVICES

  • rehabilitation
  • case management
  • youth and elderly services
  • recreation
  • administration
  • social work
  • local, state and federal agencies
  1. INSTITUTE OF SECURITY STUDIES JUSTICE & ETHICS

All programmes in ISSJE (Security studies, Peace Studies and County governance)

Career Opportunities for ISSJE students are mainly in the security sectors, and non-governmental Organisations dealing with human rights and Peace and reconciliation.

  1. Government security: Military, Police, national intelligence service, Prisons and probation centres
  2. Border security officer at Kenya Revenue Authority,
  3. Programme officers in non-governmental Organisations dealing with human rights and Peace and reconciliation.
  4. Administrators and programme officers in government institutions eg. EACC IPOA,
  5. Probation Officers in Prisons and Probation departments,
  6. Security officers and advisors in Hospitals, College, universities, Airports, Sports areas, Shopping Malls
  7. Public administration and governance:
  8. County and ward administrators
  9. Lecturer in security studies, public administration and Peace and reconciliation
  1. DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION


CAREER OPPORTUNITIES for (CJMC)

  1. Video editors
  2. Print and broadcast reporters
  3. Photographer/Photojournalists
  4. Camera operators
  5. Disc jockey

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES for( DJMC)

  1. Print Media Editors
  2. Video editors
  3. Print and broadcast reporters
  4. Photographer/Photojournalists
  5. Camera operators
  6. Sound technician
  7. Studio technician

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES for (CPR)

  1. Public Relation Assistants
  2. Communication assistant
  3. Website content developers
  4. Event organizers
  5. Guest relations Officers

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES for (DPR)

  1. Public Relation Officers
  2. Communication officers/assistant
  3. Website content developers
  4. Event organizers
  5. Guest relations officers

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES for BMMC (PR OPTION)

  1. Print Media Editors
  2. Print and broadcast reporters
  3. Photographer/Photojournalists
  4. Public Relation Officers
  5. Communication officers
  6. Website content developers
  7. Trainers
  8. Reporters
  9. TV/Radio Host
  10. Media Managers
  11. News anchors
  12. Copy writers/advertising creatives
  13. Media researchers
  14. Social media administrators
  15. Event organizers

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES for BMMC (EM OPTION)

  1. Video editors
  2. Print and broadcast reporters
  3. Photographer/Photojournalists
  4. Camera operators
  5. Media production directors
  6. Media production producers
  7. Content developers: TV, radio and online
  8. Script writers
  9. Copy writers
  10. Social media administrators
  11. Media managers

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES for (BFAS)

  1. Graphic Designers
  2. Sound Designers
  3. Film Producers
  4. Film Directors
  5. Cinematographers/videographers
  6. Animators
  7. Photographers
  8. Script Writers
  9. Advertising creatives
  10. Film researcher
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